© 2019 Guastavino Alliance

ALLIANCE MEMBERS

Basilica Shrine of Saint Mary | North Carolina

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Begun in 1909 and completed in 1911, the Spanish Baroque style building is exceptional in its construction and design. The plan is that of a Greek cross, with a high dome at the crossing, and barrel vaults above the transepts and sanctuary. Saint Mary Church is one of only a few buildings for which the Guastavinos were actually the architects. They also designed the altars, the terra cotta frieze of the apostles and other interior furnishings.

Basilica of Saint Lawrence | North Carolina

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In St. Lawrence Catholic Church every horizontal surface in the building is made of this combination of tile and mortar. The building also houses the crypt of Rafael Guastavino.

Berry College - Ford Buildings | Georgia

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Recently rediscovered as Guastavino's work, the Ford buildings were a gift of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ford.

Biltmore Estate | North Carolina

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Guastaivino was commissioned by Biltmore architect Richard Morris Hunt to create the decorative tile vaulting at Biltmore House, including the hall ceilings around the Winter Garden. His tile work in the Swimming Pool is reminiscent of the vaulting in New York City’s earliest subway stations, another Guastavino design.

Boston Public Library | Massachusetts

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Guastavino’s collaboration with Charles Follen McKim throughout a number of ceilings in the Central Library represented his first major American commission, the starting point for a company that would go on to construct vaults in over 600 buildings throughout the country..

Cathedral of Saint John the Divine | New York

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In 1909, Rafael Guastavino, Jr. constructed a tile dome for the Crossing, intended as a temporary roof. The dome covers the Crossing to the present day and is one of the largest freestanding domes in the world.

Christmount Christian Assembly | North Carolina

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Located in Black Mountain, North Carolina, is the family estate, farm and kilns of Rafael Guastavino, constructed c1895.

Grace Church | New York

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Grace Church was completed in 1846 by James Renwick's architectural firm. After James’ death in 1895, his nephew William W. Renwick oversaw a number of projects at Grace Church, including the redesign of the chantry chapel’s exterior. This redesign included a new entrance – a small porch which features a Guastavino tile vault.

Grand Central Oyster Bar & Restaurant | New York

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The Grand Central Oyster Bar was always an oyster bar, a key aspect of Grand Central Terminal’s design conceived originally by its architects at the firm Warren and Wetmore. But more accurately, it’s a reflection of the mastery of Rafael Guastavino and his son, Rafael Guastavino Jr.

Massachusetts General Hospital | Massachusetts

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Massachusetts General Hospital has received many additions over its life, including several by the Guastavino company beginning in 1901 and ending in 1921.

Nebraska State Capitol | Nebraska

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Built 1925 - The theme of the Vestibule is “Gifts of Nature to Man on the Plains”. The sun, an important gift of nature, is represented in the center of Hildrethe Meiere’s Guastavino tile dome, and is surrounded by a circular mosaic representing agricultural products of Nebraska.

Ninth Church of Christ Scientist (Christ Church Chicago) | Illinois

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Dome made of Guastavino tile erected in the 1910s

Swannanoa Valley Museum & History Center | North Carolina

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The Museum, located in Guastavino's final hometown of Black Mountain, houses several items from his former Rhododendron Estate, including the bell from the home's bell tower.

Tocci Building Corporation | Massachusetts

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When the supply of high quality ceramic tile became an issue, Guastavino decided to build his own production facility. Guastavino then purchased this Woburn property. Guastavino II, a young and talented engineer, designed the new factory. In a 1907 dedication, a local Woburn paper described it as “an ornamental brick building that looks more like an art museum than a factory.” Tocci Building Corporation purchased and rennovated the decaying Guastavino Tile Factory in 1998 — nearly 40 years after its original operation ceased.